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Management and leadership

Posted by & filed under Careers and Beyond, Programmes.

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People often separate management and leadership, quoting that managers and leaders are binary opposites with phrases such as: ‘the manager administers; the leader innovates’ or ‘the manager asks how and when; the leader asks what and why’. Despite these statements, successful practice denotes management and leadership need to be linked. A manager should be able to lead just as much as a good leader will also be savvy in the business processes and day-to-day of running of their business. To understand how each principle works hand in hand, it’s better to first understand what they mean separately, and the importance of each.

Management

Managers are generally result driven. They direct employees, look after processes and ensure day-to-day operation runs smoothly while boosting productivity and working towards assigned targets. Management without leadership could result in an uninformed workforce as to produce results managers need only tell their employees the minimum they need to know to complete their tasks. Though good managers combine employee development with traditional business processes in order to infuse management with leadership traits. Good management qualities are as follows:

1) Great time management
2) Inspirational skills
3) Understanding employee motivational triggers
4) Open communication
5) Interest in employee development

Leadership

Another term for a leader is an organised motivator. Someone who understands that people, whether employee or client, are the core of the business. This extends to allowing employees to comment on the business and effect change through processes of feedback or review and promoting a culture of critical thought. Though clearly focused on the end goal, good leaders realise that these goals should not be rushed and retain the conviction to inspire employees through difficult periods throughout the life of the business. Good leadership qualities are as follows:

1) Direction
2) People-focused
3) Empathetic
4) Adaptive
5) Knowledge of people’s strengths and weaknesses in a business

A combination of management and leadership is essential to modern management. For instance, in industrial-era factories, managers only cast a thought to results and high efficiency, whereas in the current climate value is in the knowledge of people; employees as investments, not assets. For this modern approach, management and leadership need to work together in order to produce higher outputs, fulfilled employees and a positive culture.

For an education that combines management and leadership, CUC online provides a 100% online BA in Management and Leadership, with modules including leadership concepts, the organisational environment, Information management, decision making and more.

Have a look at how you match up with this online leadership quiz: https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newLDR_50.htm

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