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Want to get ahead? Cultivate your sense of curiosity. The rewards are plenty for those who challenge themselves to never stop learning. Stay inquisitive and continue to ask questions. Growing a curious mind can help you lead a happier, healthier, more successful life.

Millions saw the apple fall, but Newton asked why. – Bernard Baruch

“She’s a fast learner.” “He picks up new concepts quickly.” These are statements we’ve all heard spoken about smart people – those we perceived to have a higher intelligence quotient (IQ). Research has shown us that the higher the IQ, the better the individual will be at absorbing knowledge and performing complex tasks. But, what about CQ? The hungry cousin of IQ, CQ (or the curiosity quotient), is proving to be your ultimate tool to uncovering simple solutions for complex problems.

According to a recent Harvard Business Review article, people with higher CQs are more tolerant of ambiguity and confusing situations, and they become invested at a higher level intellectually, especially in the arts and sciences. (Compare this to people with high IQs, who display more of a raw intellect.)

People with high CQs don’t bristle at the unknown. Also, those with a higher CQ desire answers; and as a result, they acquire a rich bank of knowledge over time. In other words, those with natural curiosity become more adept at solving complex issues simply by consistently asking questions.

Temperaments of people with high CQs include being naturally inquisitive and open to new ideas and experiences. On the flip-side, people with high CQs dislike routine and get bored more easily.

Successful leaders thirst for knowledge.

“Thriving in a complex and volatile business environment requires leaders who approach every day, every problem and every opportunity with an inquisitive spirit,” explains Michael Hsvidos, founder and CEO of Inquizo, a business solution agency. He believes that this natural curiosity encourages leaders to understand their companies from top to bottom and to always be looking for areas to improve.

What do successful leaders constantly question?

Hsvidos says gifted leaders are always searching for ways to make things better by staying curious about:

  • How to become the best leader
  • What success looks like and to teach others how to get there
  • Why team members struggle with new skills
  • Their business and their customers’ businesses

Want to get ahead? Cultivate your sense of curiosity. The rewards are plenty for those who challenge themselves to never stop learning. Stay inquisitive and continue to ask questions. Growing a curious mind can help you lead a happier, healthier, more successful life.

One Response to “High IQ? What About Your CQ? It’s time to get curious to get ahead.”

  1. Shannon

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